Media, the always controversial sarah lacy

Now for My Next Trick, I'll Turn Brand into Cash

Back in May 2008, I was on top of the world. Viewers were soaring for my newly launched Yahoo show, TechTicker, my book was about to come out and was boasting a beautifully low three-digit Amazon rank, several of my BusinessWeek columns had been among the most read stories on the site, and traffic on this blog was doubling month-over-month. (Sure it had only been open two months, but details like that don't matter when you're on top of the world.)

I was also in New York doing a slew of press interviews for the launch of my book. Not even a torrent of rain and a wind storm that eviscerated my umbrella could dampen my spirits as I Mary Tyler Moore'd all over Manhattan in a DVF dress feeling like I'd turned the world on with my ability to tell a great story and enviable access to people whose stories actually mattered. And let's be clear: No one had handed me all this. I had worked evenings, sleepless nights, sacrificed relationships and any kind of work/life balance for nearly a decade to get here. And, I thought, all the hard work had finally paid off.

But more than that, the synergy was paying off. The idea was that I'd become a "brand"-- and there was no paucity of data to back that up. There was also no shortage of media outlets willing to pay me to be that brand. As late in 2007 I carefully picked between them, I thought a lot about synergy. I didn't want just one platform, and I didn't want competing platforms. Rather, I picked platforms that would cross promote and jobs that would play to different strengths I had as a reporter, and alternatively challenge me more. As a journalist who has watched synergy rarely pay off when promised, the fact that I believed it would be so easy in boosting the next phase of my own career should have been a red flag.

That take-on-the-world morning, I was having coffee with Steven Levy, then of Newsweek, now of Wired, who challenged this whole idea of whether this "Sarah Lacy" brand was actually translating into things that mattered, like book sales, money, something real and tangible, or whether it was a just smokescreen of hype. And I granted his point. I've long been dubious of Internet celebrity's staying power. It seems the Internet famous hit that moment where they're on the Today Show, and just about to close a deal with ABC or HBO or pick the big money, you've-made-it acronym, but it never really materializes.

I've written before that one of the advantages of the Internet-- the relatively low barrier to click on something-- is an advantage for building brands and gaining distribution online, but it's also a disadvantage. People flock to you as a side-show, but don't actually want to invest real dollars to support whatever you are doing. Honestly, how many of Tila Tequila's million MySpace friends buy her CDs? There's a currency in mild watching-a-train-wreck-fascination and even hate online, that doesn't exist in the offline world in the same way. And, to date, it hasn't translated.

It's now a year after I started my synergy gambit, and in many ways, Levy is wrong. By any measure, I'm more successful working for myself than I was on staff for just one publication: income, name recognition, opportunities, amazing once-in-a-lifetime experiences. And, while I'm not immune, I'm safer heading into this downturn than in the past because all my income doesn't hinge on one gig. In terms of journalism, it's way more successful. I have the challenge only to find great stories and tell them. And generally any story I love, I've got a platform for it. Sometimes it's a visual story; sometimes it's a big idea story that's financially complex but perfect for a column. Frequently, stories aren't right for TechTicker or BusinessWeek, but might work for  this blog or a freelance project or maybe even (hint?) a new book. I can't tell you how freeing that is after years of laboriously pitching stories, writing stories I didn't care about and having to play the newsroom game. You can't put a price on autonomy.

But when it comes to stats, the synergy and the cross promotion hasn't been as easy as it would seem on paper. I've been pretty aggressive about linking between things, and if you follow me here or on Twitter, you get a pretty clear day-to-day account of my life. Yet, I'm stunned by how many people read this blog, but never go to TechTicker. Or how many people watch TechTicker, but have no idea I write a BusinessWeek column. Or how many people follow me on Twitter, but still think I'm on staff for BusinessWeek full-time. Or-- I swear to God-- the number of people who know me from any of those platforms and say, "You wrote a book?" If my life were a reality show, you could insert a montage of all the times I've said "my book" in the last year and it would be a mini-series in length. Whenever I get recognized and someone asks if I'm Sarah Lacy, I smile and say yes, but then coyly ask how they know me. Because I've learned it's different every time, and it's never all-of-the-above.

On the surface, this sounds great for me. I'm still leveraged across several platforms even if they aren't working together as well as I'd hoped. But doesn't it also mean that my "value" as a brand is diminished if I can't pull fans and readers across platforms? After all, it's supposed to be a two-way transaction.

So what gives? I'm still not sure. But I've got an inkling that this multi-year trend towards brand-this and brand-that in the business world may be in for a rude awakening. After all, there are far more high-profile examples. Think about Howard Stern: He used to be one of the most talked about, most hated, most beloved people in popular culture. His star power made talk radio relevant outside of a trucker cab. That fame translated to books, movies, television-- seemingly any media the self-appointed "king" touched. If anyone had real brand that could translate into cash it was Stern, and that's why Sirius radio gave him a serious ton of cash. And Stern was no lazy diva; he worked it. He was everywhere hawking those Sirius devices; calling it the new revolution in radio. He even had a cause: That the over-zealous FCC was killing freedom of speech. But as a great article in last week's Sunday New York Times showed, it just didn't translate. Worse: Stern lost his relevance in popular culture. And with it, his influence and likely his fair market value as a brand.

As the name of my book (ahem, mention 1,567,983 in the last year) belies, I think most success in business-- particularly startups-- is a hard to quantify mixture of being lucky and good. In May 2008, I think I felt I'd worked hard enough I could consider my synergy plan the result of being good. But nearly a year later, I'm starting to realize like so much else I was lucky. Lucky that I hedged entrepreneurial ventures like launching my own blog and my book (1,567,984) with two other media platforms that were bigger than I was, am or will probably ever be on my own. At the time a lot of people were asking why I still needed Yahoo or BusinessWeek, and I'm glad my ego wasn't so unchecked that I listened and bought into that smokescreen of hype. Instead, I continually told my husband, "I'm the new black for about five minutes. This isn't going to last."

I'm not saying brand doesn't matter. I'm just saying it doesn't matter the way it seems like it should on paper. In the last year, a lot of college kids or journalists young in their careers have asked my advice on becoming a brand, and I've told them there's no quick and easy hack to get there. It takes time, long hours, and consistent work of merit in your field. Brand that hits people fast, usually doesn't last. It's like building a house; it needs a good foundation. In my case, I worked for ten years as a boring, daily-grind business reporter, heads-down focused on producing good work, with nary a picture of myself on the Internet. Hype will come and go-- and I'll use it to my advantage when it's here-- but I always have that foundation. The trick is remembering I am a reporter, not a celebrity. That means any swankiness my job entails is usually the exception, not the rule. But, as a result, I am also not a flash-in-the-pan. The other thing I've told them is to know what they're getting into chasing the brand dream. No one tells you how hard it is to maintain it and to stomach all that comes with it, once you establish it.

I guess the third leg of that brand-reality-check stool is what I've learned in the last year: You don't just add water to brand for instant traffic and monetization. Just as there's no easy hack to becoming a brand, there's no easy hack to profiting from it. Put another way: You never get to coast. For another great example, check out this article about Maria Bartiromo, one of the most important pioneers and biggest brands in the cable news business who still works every bit as hard and watches over one shoulder for someone to steal her thunder. She has to. We all do.

In the last day, I've made a list of about a dozen New Years Resolutions. For me, it's a very personal process so unlike a lot of bloggers, I won't share them here. But in the wee hours of this sleepless morning, I've just added another one: To keep only a passive eye on the stats in 2009, because what matters more in taking my career to the next level is that same heads-down journalistic hard work that got me here in the first place, not how many friends, page views or links I get.

Comments

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People forget that it's not just brand. It's an interrelationship between Brand (what you say about you), reputation (what others say about you), and Authority (what others say about who/what you know).

Anyone's life is a complex mix of these three elements.

smp

Fantastic post, Sarah. Very thoughtful, very honest, and so very, very true.

interesting article. We had a similar discussion at a London (UK) bloggers meeting a few weeks ago and the whole monetization thing was part of the debate. The typical London mix of Brits, Europeans, Americans and everyone else were pretty split.

For some the Personal Brand and Monetize was the main show, and for others it was all much more a by-product.

There's a filtering process around 'self promotion' and the people who spend time getting to be top of the pops need something beyond the stats to credentialise their position.

'Outcome' speaks volumes.

Glad I've found your musings!

rashbre

Wonderfully written...I have been working with companies on the importance of staying focused on the long term "Brand Strategy" for a while now. "Complex" is correct. I have always stated Brand does not always directly affect ROI. Thanks for your post! I am a new fan and will purchase your book the next chance I get. Congrats on your success!

I like the idea about building and maintaining a solid foundation regarding brand building. As you mention, you're not going to be able to "just add water" to monetize and have long term success without a solid foundation and that takes time to develop. Also, the idea of constant improvement and always "looking over your shoulder" in your reference to Maria Bartiromo cannot be over emphasized enough. It's always better to always be innovating and it's much less risky to be doing that from a position of strength.

Interesting perspective. I read your book and follow you on Twitter. I don't see you as a brand, more so someone who has insights and opinions that are worth my time. You add value to me and most likely to those who read you online, in BW or in your book. I don't connect those places to you as much as I connect you to what I would consider reading. Keep up the good work!

Fascinating. I know what you mean about spreading the eggs and hoping for convergence (which I think only happens when all the things intertwine or when the media are writing about you, rather than you're creating things).

If I had a pound for every time someone said "i didn't realise you had a label too" or "oh, so DrownedinSound was a website before you signed Martha Wainwright" I'd have made more money than being in the record business.

It's a funny ol' world but here's hoping 2009 makes it all begin to make more sense.

Love your insight - "you never get to coast" is so true!!! I think today - brand helps but value is king to get through the tons of information being bombarded our way.

Well said. Trump comes to mind. World wide brand recognition, stock trades at .20 cents. As you mentioned yesterday, at the end of the day, it's all about the product Not even Tiger Woods could turn Buick around.

That's a great point Sarah ... it's kind of like I've got a brand, now what? Here's to a beautiful future ... whatever that may be :)

Sarah, excellent article! Keep it up.

The only thing I know about you is that you gave a poor interview with the founder of Facebook. You're a good writer, but you come across as self involved. You're not tech reporter I value, I see you as a person living a tv show version of your life. The erudite literati elite may sing your praises but they are irrelevant in my world of code and bytes. You have no credibility, I don't care how much access you have to founders and celebrities. I appreciate your hard work, but to win over my crowd you need rebirth through 4chan and baptism via xkcd. You're just not geeky enough. If you disagree I'd have to ask you to ask your self about how long ago it was the last time you played left4dead or possibley Fallout3 on Xbox Live?:

I don't know you personally, but to be completely honest about your brand, I only have two thoughts in my mind when I see your name come up somewhere online:

- Your interview with Mark at SXSW
- The review the NYTimes gave your book

Because of those two things, I don't know if I can ever really see your name attached to something and think about it in a glowing, positive light. After reading this blog entry I can see how much you've accomplished and how you've tried to come back, but honestly, I don't know if I'll ever see your brand the way you've described it.

my gosh, what can i say that would be heard? not a thing.

Thanks for the reminder that there is no coasting in reputation/brand building. The hard work never stops. As soon as Michael Jordan left basketball his brand started to decline exponentially much as a hot poker cools when removed from the furnace.

Here's to a 2009 that sees more of your work Sarah!

-Stiennon

Ms. Lacy,
I think you have a long way to go. I agree with Mike Rundle's comment for the most part. I also think it was simply a poor choice to write this post. All you really care about is making yourself into a brand. I hope for your own sake that you continue to closely monitor your stats on all fronts, so you will actively manage and improve the "Sarah Lacy Empire."

The general sentiment I took from this post is 'having a personal brand is great, but you have to put in the work to get it'.

It's a useful reminder to those who want (and somtimes) get the personal brand but without doing much. The universe usually catches up and they soon disappear.

However, there are many people out there who are working just as hard, some even harder, than you - and still haven't managed to achieve a status or personal brand, despite their best efforts.

I think as much as you have focused (in this post) on the amount of work and sacrifice you have put in, I think the key thing is indeed to remember the title of your book. There is luck here too, Sarah. You need both, and while everyone can work hard only some get the luck.

As much as I think this is an interesting piece I didn't read much reflection from the 'luck' that you've had. And by luck I don't mean that this was handed on a plat, but 'lucky to get the opportunities to *then* be able to work hard toward your goal'.

I think too many people forget the luck they've had, and more importantly don't help create more luck (opportunity) for others to help them achieve similar successes.

I don't mean for this to be a a negative comment. So I shall finish by congratulating you on your successes, Sarah, and wishing you the very best for 2009.

I appreciate your thoughts on branding, Sarah, and share your optimism for 2009. My suggestion is that you shift your focus toward adding more value to your readers and fans versus "shameless self-promotion". To be honest, I receive more value from Cali Lewis' GeekBrief podcast and her blog than I've ever received from your posts, interviews, articles, and book, simply because she shares information that I value in a way that treats me as an equally-valuable human being. The more you focus on the needs of your readers/fans, and the more they feel heard and respected by you, the better chance you have to create a long-lasting, influential brand.

Here's to a rewarding 2009.

hey everyone. tons of comments and twitters on this-- thanks to all! just a few responses:

bjorn: i'm a business reporter and a writer. i don't claim to be a coder and never did! so if that's no value to you, you probably shouldn't read my blog. but clearly you are if you're commenting so thanks! ;)

ben: 100% i benefited from luck. i actually have written about that a good deal on this blog and talked about it in a lot of interviews. but nothing has come easily to me-- that's the difference. luck alone doesn't a career make.

Sarah - Overnight success, yours is not. That's the key, yes? It's not a case of the Internet allowing easy access to insta-celebrity status from which one may profit, but a case of working very hard to determine the best outlets to strategically push the content & brand you've worked so hard to create. (After all, it wasn't Joey Ramone's ode to Maria Bartiromo that shot her to the top in the world of business journalism, but her status as a savvy money honey that brought her to Joey's attention.;) ) And, it doesn't hurt to be lucky, or as Gladwell would put it, to be born in the right place at the right time.
Neither Maria Bartiromo, nor you are ones to rest on your laurels or let celebrity be the catalyst that drives you professionally -- you're both smart women who have built up successful journalistic careers. Because your audiences appreciate the work you do, and you've been able to connect with them in the right places at the right times, your "brand share" increases, and with wider recognition and larger audiences, you are afforded access to bigger and better stories. As long as you keep up the good work, your brand will increase in "value" and you and your audience both benefit. Win/win.
No, there's no quick and easy way to create or to capitalize on a personal brand, but it doesn't hurt to: do what you do very well; work very hard and very consistently at it; and be willing to toot your own horn when it's due.
Cheers in 2009, Sarah!

Very open and honest post. I respect you for sharing it. I'm not as familiar as the others with your work, but I guess my big question after reading it all, though, is:

Does enjoying a litany of achievements = a brand?

I don't mean that in a snarky way. I'm genuinely curious if we get too caught up in "brand" that we assign anything to it.

Sometimes a person is good at something, but they haven't -- and maybe shouldn't -- establish themselves as brand or icon tied to that something.

This is a subject I have been fascinated about for 20 years. I had a number of Olympic-level athlete friends. Personal branding was a way for them to generate sponsorship deals and then extend their careers beyond their competition days. Mary Lou Retton was a leader in this regard.

More recently I have compiled my list of celebrity branders who have done it well. My list has included Martha Stewart, the Olsen Twins, and Oprah, But only Oprah has managed to avoid some of the side issues that can tarnish a personal brand.

I've done PR for musicians and I don't think it is wise to manufacture an image. You've got to promote the person as he or she really is because anything else will quickly be discovered. So either people connect with a person as a brand for legitimate reasons or it isn't likely to go very far as a concept.

At any rate, thanks for sharing your own experiences with this. Very interesting article.

brandon: it's definitely open to interpretation! and not so much my word as the one my employers, people who book me for speaking gigs or appearances or what-not have used.

there is a certain style, subject matter and type of writing i'm known for-- which as you can see from the comments some people like and some people hate! i guess the difference is when people started talking about *me* not my work. believe me, i prefer the latter. but it's a luxury i can't afford in today's media climate, especially if i want the kind of freedom i enjoy now. i have to be more than an anonymous byline to survive. it's a trade off.

but i agree it sounds totally pretentious and has a pretty elastic definition! i think one reason we'll see a correction is this "over branding" of everything-- including people!

I remember your SXSW interview -- but not the interview as much as the responses to the interview. It was my first SXSW. It was a meta moment.

I also remember seeing one of your videos 4 months ago, commenting on Twitter to you, and you actually responding about 9 hours later (per search.twitter.com) I'm nobody. Clearly, you are on your game in that you took the time to reply to a random Twitter. +1 Karma and what not...

Then there was the whole VP "sarahcuda" thing. When the VP selection hit and the press pulled out the nickname -- it hit me. I realized that my mind already had one "sarahcuda" in it. Those pesky political reporters. Perhaps your "sarahcuda" will have longer staying powers than a recent VP candidate in areas and markets that matter in monetary terms.

So, I'm thinking this tweet is applicable if you keep it up...

http://twitter.com/qthrul/status/1093763567

Going from a partially hostile crowd to an adoring sea of fans at the same venue takes a few years in music time. I think high crowd polarization in early careers might be a sign of grander future successes.

Maybe you can chart that in years of Internet time?

I guess turning tricks is not limited to the oldest profession.

I think most people in business view the personal brand/want to be fame trend as a little amateur. You don't hear the great people who do things in business doing that nonsense. Do the work, do it well, and those two elements come in.

It really isn't just about "developing a brand." It's about developing as a human being. It keeps you honest (especially because people can cross-check you on multiple mediums - in my case, twitter/the blog/IRL), helps you grow - and allows you to lead the way for others. You mention in the post that you've been sharing what you've gleaned with others. Perhaps that's what legacy is - sharing what we've discovered on our path.

Posts like these are important for those who think you can "make" and then "monetize" your brand. You have to be yourself, work hard, and that may turn into a following. But if it doesn't, you're still doing what you love. And that has to be enough. Ultimately, I don't think what you're after...or what I'm after, what we're after collectively...is money. Or even attention. We're all looking for happiness/connection and some find it through involvement in a lot of projects. I think that's perfectly ok. I don't define success with a stick that has the word, "money," on it. Judging from this post, you don't either.

Great read. I look forward to more in the New Year. Thanks for the reminders to keep working to reveal the smokescreens that sometimes hold us back.

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I don't know what to say... I'm absolutely FLOORED. I hired them to hack into my ex's Yahoo email. After about a week I became very skeptical. "OK, this guy's just making fake guestbook entries and collecting cash...". I emailed them asking if this was the case, he kindly responded that he was working on it. Next day, a screenshot. Not a doctored screenshot, because I remember what the inbox looks like and all the folders in it. No, it was real, with real emails from me. I was still skeptical, thinking, "OK, maybe he has some program that can do that, but can it really get passwords, can he hack Yahoo email?" I paid, in reality it is not a lot of money in the end. The password even made me skeptical, it was so simple. Certainly it's possible, I've researched it, but could this guy really be who he says he is? But low and behold, it's the real one. I'm shocked from my doubt. This guy Active Hackers is the real thing. I'm still in shock. Thanks man, I can't thank you enough. My heart can breathe a little better, now.

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Wow. Like brands. How cool.

Substance has a way of sticking around. Shallow reporting doesn't.

Wow. Like brands. How cool.

Substance has a way of sticking around. Shallow reporting doesn't.

A brand you are definitely not, somewhat insightful, a poor interviewer at times, and definitely not in tune to what is truly "tech". I do find you enjoyable at times, and tolerate you at others. Good luck in it all.

What's the entry say? I can't see the text on Firefox.

My personal brand is new and heavy, like the band. Feelin' fine in '09 peace and we out!

Actually never mind after commenting the text shows up. So I will comment so I can read stuff.

Why does it matter to you that folks follow you on all your platforms? The audience is fractured and dispersed. As journalists, it's up to us to reach them on the platforms where they consume news and information, adapting our content to suit those platforms, rather than insisting they follow us somewhere else. Some small percentage of the audience probably follows you everywhere and find you in one place and then migrate to another. But most won't. And in my opinion, that's nothing to worry about, and certainly not a failing. It's just the reality of how media consumption habits have evolved.

This is the first time I have read a StacyLacy post. I would say the reason for your success so far and I'm sure in the future is the quality of your writing... Most posts- I'm asleep by the third line... Here, I was held all the way to the end. I was also inspired by your self confessed reality check. I'm pretty active in new media and companies active in that area and most can't answer my nagging 'but how do you make real money'query. Very cool jobs but in the end, it get very tiring being cool but broke. It will be interesting in 2009 to see who survives.

seeing as your not looking at stats, it won't matter if I say I will be back.
Thx

This is an absolutely fantastic article. You really portray the ups and downs of not only the brands that you create, but your feelings and emotions that come with branding your products. It is easy to self-brand yourself and get nowhere. I do believe that hard work and dedication really make a difference.

I think there is another aspect to branding yourself and that is others looking to tear you down and tell you what a mistake your doing. I think that your success comes with a lot of tolerance. I commend you for that.

What a great article. I will definitely be looking for future posts by you!

Amazing post. I'm currently working on expanding my brand reach. I have a book (working on #2), am all about social media, have a blog and my marketing firm. I put in a lot of hard work trying to establish myself (working on speaking this year). What's next? What component am I missing? Please don't say time!!

One thing that struck me when reading this article is that not once when you reference your cross-promotional platforms did you actually link to them inline. Let's be honest about the laziness involved in a casual attention environment. If you linked to TechTicker or your Twitter feed directly i'd probably have clicked on it by now. I don't mean this pedantically or in a glib manner. Such is the attention economy. At least dangle the hook in front of me to bite? Affiliate marketplaces generate billions of sales each year by taking this simple in-your-path approach to impulse buying/action.

Clearly this won't solve your problem wholly but it couldn't hurt?

Best of luck,
Niel

See Sarah. This is why you're the brand that you are. You write and report good stuff. It's all objective and real. So, as a Sarah Lacy fan myself, this blog, techticker and your book are all reasons that you're one of the first mavens that come to my mind when it comes to web reporting. Keep on kicking azz!

Hi Sarah. I saw your most recent Tech Ticker post and wanted to comment but thought there was a better chance of reaching you here than over there. I think you're kind of overvaluing those comScore online video numbers. Not to say they're inaccurate, but when you do the math on those numbers you're talking about an increase of about 1 minute of viewing per person per day. Also, while the year-to-year growth percentages have been big, month-by-month growth is flattening out. There were actually fewer videos watched online in November than in October. I'm not sure that has ever happened before.

Also enjoyed your piece with Paul K. on facebook's value. I tend to agree with him that online advertising is drying up and the site is insanely overvalued. I'm a daily facebook user and a big fan, and yet I have no idea how they're ever going to turn that site into money. I don't think it will ever happen.

Have fun at CES. Cheers.

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I don't know what to say... I'm absolutely FLOORED. I hired them to hack into my ex's Yahoo email. After about a week I became very skeptical. "OK, this guy's just making fake guestbook entries and collecting cash...". I emailed them asking if this was the case, he kindly responded that he was working on it. Next day, a screenshot. Not a doctored screenshot, because I remember what the inbox looks like and all the folders in it. No, it was real, with real emails from me. I was still skeptical, thinking, "OK, maybe he has some program that can do that, but can it really get passwords, can he hack Yahoo email?" I paid, in reality it is not a lot of money in the end. The password even made me skeptical, it was so simple. Certainly it's possible, I've researched it, but could this guy really be who he says he is? But low and behold, it's the real one. I'm shocked from my doubt. This guy Active Hackers is the real thing. I'm still in shock. Thanks man, I can't thank you enough. My heart can breathe a little better, now.

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Thanks for sharing Sarah, I like the last part, ignoring the stats, head down bum up doing the hard work, likewise I plan to do the same this year. Let the numbers sink into the background and aggressively do what i do best.

The Things You Absolutely Must Know To how to hack into someones facebook I tried one of other group www. yourhackerz com but they scammed me $250 USD. They did not reply my even 1 email after leaving me speechless. Thanks god I found http://www.rayahari.com/hack-Facebook-passwords.php to save my marriage. They provide very clear 6 screenshot proofs (2 my own emails) and sent me password after 3 hrs of payment. thanks again http://www.rayahari.com/hack-Facebook-passwords.php will use their how to hack facebook passwords service again in the future.

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Diane Calhoun, Lincoln
England

Hi Sarah,

I love your writing in this post - it's incredibly engaging and personal and I appreciate your honesty.

As I was reading it over my teeny mobile phone screen at the airport yesterday, I felt pushed to ask myself what the value of a brand (my own, nascent one for example) really is worth.

Why do I desire to own my brand, especially if there's no guaranteed upside?

I guess part of it is that I love other people, and I love to shine. Put the two together, and you get me trying my best to shine myself outward to others, so that I can be closer to them, perhaps.

Likewise, I think companies, at least in part, build brands in order to create a connection between their internal business or product workings and their customers, their audience. The better that connection, the stronger the financial upside can be.... maybe that's it?

Thanks for writing this - I'll be thinking about it for awhile! (ps- loved seeing you at hi5 when you came there a few months back)

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Paula Robinson, New York
US

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I found the yahoo hacking password services from MilanoRosa.com to be simply brilliant! Here is their website:

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I'd had my suspicions for quite some time, that my wife was having an affair with her boss. However I didn't have any idea how I could prove it for sure, I mean I didn't want her to know I didn't trust her in case I was wrong. Anyway, after hiring yahoo hacking password services from MilanoRosa.com and cracking her email / facebook passwords, I discovered that she was having an affair and it had been going on for longer than I thought. Not sure what I'm going to do now, but I'm glad I know.

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England

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"Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky" puts a well-deserved spotlight on the fascinating entrepreneurs working in some of the most overlooked places on Earth. This book reminds us that when entrepreneurial opportunity is enabled and embraced locally, the economic and social benefits have the power to transform us all.
Brilliant. Crazy. Cocky.

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An unforgettable portrait of the emerging world's entrepreneurial dynamos Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky is the story about that top 1% of people who do more to change their worlds through greed and ambition than politicians, NGOs and nonprofits ever can. This new breed of self-starter is taking local turmoil and turning it into opportunities, making millions, creating thousands of jobs and changing the face of modern entrepreneurship at the same time. To tell this story, Lacy spent forty weeks traveling through Asia, South America and Africa hunting down the most impressive up-and-comers the developed world has never heard of....yet.

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Srah Lacy

Sarah Lacy is an award-winning reporter who has covered high-growth entrepreneurship for more than fifteen years. She is the founder, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of PandoDaily.com, the site-of-record for the startup ecosystem. She lives in San Francisco.

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